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Syllabi, Student Evaluations, Reflections 2022-2023 Academic Year
Syllabi, Student Evaluations, Reflections 2021-2022 Academic Year

Syllabi, Student Evaluations, Reflections

2023-2024 Academic Year

Spring 2023

MUCS 420, 430, 630 & MUCP 499: Trumpet Lessons, Studio, & Senior Recital Performance

Syllabus

MUCP 495: Musicians' Wellness

Syllabus

MUAP 364: Brass Quintets (Frackenpohl Honors Brass Quintet)

Syllabus

Fall 2022

MUCS 420, 430, 630 & MUCP 499: Trumpet Lessons, Studio, & Senior Recital Performance

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

MUCE 395: Musicians' Wellness

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

Reflections: 

While I understand the importance of finding ways to evaluate the student experience, there is much research that confirms that these are often skewed by the gender and race of the instructor, and therefore I do not put much weight on them. While my evaluations are often very positive and I feel confident about my abilities to teach and connect to students, I also attribute much of that to the fact that I am naturally very nurturing as a part of my personality. That is a quality that students often expect (according to the research) women faculty to have.  If I did not naturally come by that quality but taught the same content and provided a similar experience, I wonder what my course evaluations would look like. 

I also believe that I teach subjects that lend themselves to a positive student experience. Rather than using these evaluations as a reflection on me, I prefer to use them as a reflection on the overall student experience. I believe it's impactful that many students in my Musicians' Wellness course feel that it should be a required course. That indicates to me that the curriculum does not provide enough courses to support the "whole musician" and students are often left feeling ill equipped to manage the stress and lifestyle of being musicians. I believe much of the same is true with my trumpet studio. While I have deep knowledge of trumpet pedagogy, students seem to be most positively impacted by the mentorship relationship and ability to connect with me.

Instead, I assess my impact on student experience based on: how my students perform in levels, juries, and recitals, how well my Musicians' Wellness class enrolls, what my students tell prospective students, and the job/graduate school opportunities my students have once they graduate. Additionally, an invaluable tool for me has been open and lengthy conversations about pedagogy with my brass colleagues at Crane and across the country. I welcome feedback constantly from students, alum, and fellow faculty and use these conversations to grow as a teacher and musician.

2022-2023 Academic Year

Spring 2023

MUCS 420, 430, 630 & MUCP 499: Trumpet Lessons, Studio, & Senior Recital Performance

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

MUCE 395: Musicians' Wellness

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

MUAP 364: Brass Quintets

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

Fall 2022

MUCS 420, 430, 630 & MUCP 499: Trumpet Lessons, Studio, & Senior Recital Performance

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

MUCE 395: Musicians' Wellness

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

2021-2022 Academic Year

 

Spring 2022

MUCS 420, 430, & MUCP 499: Trumpet Lessons, Studio, & Senior Recital Performance

Syllabus

Student Evaluations (430)

Student Evaluations (420)

MUCE 395: Musicians' Wellness

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

MUCP 323: Instrumental Repertoire & Pedagogy II

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

MULP 105: Non-Music Major Lessons

Syllabus

Student Evaluations (Percussion)

Student Evaluations (Brass)

Student Evaluations (Piano)

Student Evaluations (Woodwind)

MUCP 405: Teaching Lessons to Non-Majors

Syllabus

Student Evaluations (002)

Student Evaluations (001)

 

Fall 2021

MUCS 420 & 430: Trumpet Lessons & Studio

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

MUAP 364: Brass Quintets

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

MUAP 365 & 665: Crane Brass Ensemble

Syllabus

Student Evaluations

MULP 105: Non-Music Major Lessons

Syllabus

Student Evaluations (Strings)

Student Evaluations (Brass)

Student Evaluations (Percussion)

Student Evaluations (Piano)

Student Evaluations (Woodwind)

MUCP 405: Teaching Lessons to Non-Majors

Syllabus

Student Evaluations 

2020-2021 Academic Year

Spring 2021

MUCS 420, 430, & MUCP 499: Trumpet Lessons, Studio, & Senior Recital Performance

Syllabus

MUAP 340: Crane Trumpet Ensemble

Syllabus

MUCC 123: Trumpet Techniques

Syllabus

MUCE 395: Musicians' Wellness

Syllabus

 

Fall 2020

MUCS 420 & 430: Trumpet Lessons & Studio

Syllabus

MUAP 365 & 665: Crane Brass Ensemble

Syllabus

MUCC 123: Trumpet Techniques

Syllabus

MUCP 322: Instrument Repertoire & Pedagogy I

Syllabus

Syllabi, Student Evaluations, Reflections 2020-2021 Academic Year
Syllabi, Student Evaluations, Reflections 2023-2024 Academic Year
Letters of Support

Letters of Support

Dr. Peyden Shelton, Associate Director of the School of Music & Associate Professor of Trumpet, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (2024)

Letter

Dr. Charles Guy, Professor of Tuba and Euphonium, Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam, Potsdam, NY (2023)

Letter

Dr. Erin Brooks, Associate Professor of Music History, Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam, Potsdam, NY (2024)

Letter

Teaching Observations

Teaching Observations 

Dr. Shelly Tramposh, Professor of  Viola (November 2022)

Observation

Heather Wheeler, Associate Professor of Functional Keyboard (November 2023)

Observation

Student Successes

Student Successes

Layne Sullivan (BM '24), Admitted to graduate schools for MM in Trumpet Performance and chose to attend the Eastman School with a Teaching Assistantship. 

Jacob Rushlow (MM '23), Full-time management position with Lake Placid Sinfonietta
Dillon Niles (BM '25), Frackenpohl Honors Brass Quintet

Rebecca Wertenberger (BM '25), Frackenpohl Honors Brass Quintet

The Wakefield Brass Quintet, First Place, Crane Chamber Music Competition
Nick Vest (BM '23), Admitted to graduate schools for trumpet performance and chose to attend SUNY Purchase

Tyler Zapata (BM '23), Admitted to graduate schools for trumpet performance and chose to attend University of Missouri Kansas City

Emma Uruburu (BM '23), K-12 Music Instructor, Fulton City School District, Fulton, NY

Amelia McNamara (BM '23), K-12 Music Instructor, Taconic Hills CSD, Craryville, NY

Amelia McNamara (BM '23), selected to perform for the Crane Honors Convocation (Spring 2022)

Program

Crane Trumpet Ensemble (non-credited), advanced to the semi-finals of the National Trumpet Competition (Spring 2022)

Brianna Yaghy (BM '22), K-12 Music Instructor, Dolgeville Central School, Dolgeville, NY

Nolan Ostrowski (BM '22), General Music Teacher, Altmar-Parish-Williamstown Central School District, Parish, NY

Statement of Teaching Philosophy

Statement of Teaching Philosophy

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Teaching Philosophy

Teaching music is a multifaceted task that involves teaching others to play instruments, play rhythms correctly, place pitches properly, fine tune each note, conceptualize beautiful sounds, and deal with a multitude of physical factors. For this reason, I take an approach to teaching that addresses the student as a whole person. I aim to offer an education that supports students’ goals while addressing their uniqueness in who they are as individuals. As a strong advocate for wellness for musicians, I understand that this art goes beyond the fundamentals of learning techniques and repertoire, and I also have a passion for teaching students to develop healthy habits in mind and body while becoming complete musicians. 

 

I have been fortunate to have professors and mentors with expansive knowledge of pedagogy. They have instilled in me a strong foundation of pedagogical knowledge, and I aim to do the same for my students. I honor the importance of traditional pedagogy, while allowing my curiosity (as well as my students’) to introduce me to pedagogical techniques being developed and implemented today. I value the significance of being a constant learner, a quality I hope to impart to my students. I display these habits by asking questions throughout each lesson and encourage them to come to conclusions on their own or find the ways that they learn best so they are able to continue their learning journey outside of my office.

 

As a teacher, I work to find a balance between acknowledging the individuality of every student, while keeping a high standard of excellence and consistent goals. I expect each of my students to work towards strong fundamentals, versatility, knowledge of the instrument and its history, healthy habits for longevity of performing, and consistent growth as a musician and contributor to society. With each student, I cater to how they respond to instruction so they can best reach these goals. Aside from the standard learning styles, I recognize that each student comes with their own unique story. I am fortunate to have diverse students in the realms of socioeconomic status, race, neurodiversity, gender, disabilities, and other histories and identities. I work to keep myself aware of these factors and seek understanding and learning to the best of my ability, while also acknowledging that my experience will never mirror theirs. I know that no two students will learn the same way, and I truly enjoy individualizing instruction to ensure that each student is equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop. As somebody who is enthusiastic about the physical and mental wellbeing of musicians, I implement parts of my trainings and knowledge in the subject to create healthy practices for my students while they maintain the rigorous practice and schedule that being a musician requires.

 

It is important to me that my students participate in multiple musical outlets. While private instruction is essential, chamber music, large ensembles, and involvement in non-classical genres are imperative to developing a musician. Through these experiences, students learn significant interpersonal and musical skills. They are required to effectively communicate, collaborate and work as a team, and be willing to step up as leaders. Chamber music allows for developing the ability to match sounds and focus on intonation and rhythm. Large ensemble playing reinforces many of these skills, while giving students access to musical knowledge and interpretation of a conductor, along with other instrumentalists in the group.  Lastly, performing in non-classical genres creates a versatile musician. It helps to prepare students for multiple types of musical environments, fully preparing them to be successful. 

 

Most of all, I hope to create an atmosphere of reciprocated trust and respect with my students so they are ambitious in setting objectives, and we can work together to be held accountable in achieving those goals. I aim to be not only a teacher, but also a mentor, on the path to support my students and work for their success in any field they choose to pursue. I believe that teaching is a partnership between mentor and mentee and that lessons should feel like a safe space to ask questions, be vulnerable, and be honest. My trauma-informed trainings have inspired to me to minimize any power dynamics within my teaching, while still working to maintain clear boundaries. I find that when students feel safe to be honest and open with me, they feel less shame and ultimately learn quicker even when external factors don’t allow them to spend as much time on the material as they would like. I believe that compassion does not need to substitute holding high standards, but in fact supports it. When my students know how much I care for them, they feel inspired to work hard and reach for the potential that I see within them.

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